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Exterior Do’s & Don’ts for the Aesthetically Challenged – Part I

As promised in my previous post, The Design Dilemma, I’d like to talk aboutthe exterior aesthetics of a post and beam home.  I’ll do this over the course of three blog posts so as not to cause your eyes to cross and/or your mind to go numb!

 

Exterior Dos & Don’ts Part 1

Often the first thing that comes to mind when picturing the exterior of a post and beam home is the typical log-home sitting in a forest of evergreens on the side of a mountain. While this is certainly one way to go, it is by no means the only way as there are nearly endless possibilities to consider when planning your new post and beam home. While the intensive planning may at times seem overwhelming, it doesn’t have to be that way. Here are a few guidelines which will assist you in achieving the right look and feel to the exterior of your new post and beam home.

 

Do Allow Your Site To Have Its Say. When considering the exterior appearance of your post and beam home the choices seem endless, but there is a powerful influence that often goes unheard in this process. Be sure to listen to what your build site has to tell you. Take cues from your site such as its geographical location, light sources and topography. It’s likely you will need to make allowances for how the site will affect the structure anyway, so why fight it? Listen to what your site is telling you from the beginning and you’ll be ahead of the game; the bonus will be your dream home will look and function all the better for having done so.

 

This homes sites on a heavily regulated half acre costal site

This homes sites on a heavily regulated half acre coastal site

 

This post and beam takes full advantage of the beautiful Rockie Mountains!

This post and beam takes full advantage of the beautiful Rocky Mountains!

Don’t Cut Down All Your Trees! Often one of the first things to happen when a site is being readied for a new house is the clearing of trees. This is obviously necessary to make room for the home and provide good light sources, but take care when doing so. Find a reputable land enhancement crew. Don’t hire your husband’s nephew because he’s great with a chain saw and is willing to do it in exchange for use of the wood. This is definitely one of those areas where you get what you pay for. Once those trees are down, there’s no replacing old growth for a long, long time. I strongly recommend hiring a company that specializes in site prep and has at least one person on staff who is a certified arborist.

This lakeside post and beam wisely kept some old growth trees

This lakeside post and beam wisely kept some old growth trees

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